Tag Archives: Chuck Bordell

11Aug/20

Title Spotlight: Marauder

Some say there’s honor among thieves and some say that when they put one of yours in the hospital, you put two of theirs in the morgue. Both phrases were probably said at some time by the Kirk Connell, the hero of Marauder.

Marauder marks a change in tone for Silverline veteran Sidney Williams. This title is a true high octane action-adventure book from the master of horror. Marauder comes complete with gunfights, knife-fights, judo-flips, a rocket launcher, and heavily armed spy boats. During this escapade, William takes the reader across the Atlantic from New York to Paris as one man’s quest for justice pits him against a shadowy band of mercenaries.

We start this quest in New York during your typical diamond heist. A stone precious beyond cost in a heavily guarded museum display case. Two men tasked by the Thieve’s Guild with the diamonds capture. Those two men are Kirk and his mentor Lumley. Of course, it can’t go all according to plan.

Their heist is quickly crashed by a band of heavily armed mercenaries gunning for the same diamond. Whereas the Thieve’s went in with stealth in mind, the mercs are more of the smash-and-grab type. A firefight breaks out and Lumley goes down. Kirk tries to fight back but the mercs brought a rocket launcher and send Kirk running for cover, leaving the diamond behind. The leader of the mercenaries hits Kirk with a marker round but leaves to recover his compatriot, assumed dead.

Kirk returns to the Thieve’s guild and seeks their blessing in hunting down the gunmen. He does not receive it but decides to pursue them anyway. He is forced to leave the guild and fend for himself in his new venture with Lumley disabled.

The leader of the assault team, a man named Elapse turns over the diamond to Judas Rathbone also known as the Vulture. Judas runs this mercenary outfit and has put together a new plan, they just needed the diamond to finance it. He tasks Elapse now with capturing Jasmine Stowe, one of the world’s leading financial experts. With her working for the Vulture, he can hold the world’s markets hostage.

Meanwhile, Kirk takes Lumley to a specialized medical facility in hopes of saving his life. The situation is dire, but Kirk is desperate. As it turns out, Kirk made the right call. Lumley pulls through but without the use of his legs.

Across the world in the French Riviera, Elapse and another merc known as Chasm find Jasmine Stowe on vacation with a friend and take them both. The countdown is set until Jasmine breaks under their torture and helps them manipulate the world’s markets. It’s up to Kirk to get there in time and dish out justice with the help of Lumley.

Marauder is a classic action-adventure story. With a globe-trotting hero, a conspiracy bent on world domination and a powerful 80’s-action-star-mullet, what’s not to love? This story will have something in it for any sort of action fan with elements pulling from shoot-em-up movies, to international intrigue, and high-tech gadgets.

What really makes Marauder it’s own is its ability to pull on classic tropes without falling into cliche or the pitfalls common in the genre. Perhaps the prevalent example of this is its avoidance of a romance sub-plot. Jasmine turns out to be just as much a hero as Kirk. Their stories happen in parallel but they don’t intersect until the very end. Each character operates in more than one dimension, caring about the bigger issue at hand but also trying to take care of their existing friendships but Williams takes care to not muddy the water with forced romance that could undermine the stakes each character faces.

You can also see that in how the story avoids another common pitfall of action stories. That issue being action-leading-to-action. This is what happens where the story just feels like one prolonged fight as the story is driven only by encounters with little room for character. Each issue has its fair share of fights and chases, but there is a lot of time spent on each character working to achieve their goals or even just existing outside of combat. This does a lot to add to the pacing of the story as well as make the characters all feel that much more real.

Marauder is a definite must-read for fans of action-adventure stories that want something that knows what works and what’s familiar but doesn’t let the formula dictate how the story is told.

Marauder was created and written by Sidney Williams. A Silverline vet who is known for his work on Mantus Files, Bloodline, Friar Rush, and many others. Williams is also an accomplished novelist with many titles under his belt.

The art was penciled by Jaxon Renick who is known by Silverline readers for his work on Silverstorm Volume 2 and the upcoming White Devil.

That same art was inked by Chuck Bordell who also inked Silverstorm Volume 2, Sirens, Switchblade, and the upcoming White Devil.

The lettering was done by Brad Thomte, Debbie Woods, and Larry Rains.

Marauder is currently being colored by Rebecca Winslow with plans to be re-released in the future in full color.

28Apr/20

Silverline Title Spotlight: Sirens issues 1 -4

The streets of New Orleans have come alive. Mardi Gras is in full swing and the streets of the French Quarter are packed with celebrators, tourists, and the dead!

   Jeff Delmer, a resident of the Crescent City and investment broker, has been rather down and out during the week-long celebration. It’s a week without work and, while he isn’t fond of his job, it’s all he’s got. Until he and an enchanting gal exchange glances across the street. Their fling turns into a romance and then to love. There’s just one hitch in this love story. Remember earlier when I said the dead were also walking the streets?

As it turns out, Lois, Jeff’s new love, is a Siren looking to break free from the voodoo-practicing witch she’s been enthralled to. Unwittingly brought under the effects of a centuries-old curse, Jeff wakes up one day to find Lois missing, his face-melting, and the adventure of a lifetime before him.

Sirens is a story about zombies, witches, Louisiana’s mythology, and most of all love. The story takes place in New Orleans, home to a handful of stories in the Silverline catalog. Like those other stories, the city and the cultures that call it home play just as much a part of the story as the characters do. The hero of this story is Jeff Delmer, an investment broker who has inherited the business from his father. Jeff is as unlikely a character as anyone for the kind of mess he gets wrapped up in. He perseveres, however, driven by a love, unlike anything he’s felt before, aided by some strange friends, and with a little help from divine relics.

The story of Sirens starts in the French Quarter during Mardi Gras. There Jeff catches sight of Lois standing in the rain and is immediately taken by her beauty. He invites her to grab some coffee with him and something about Jeff sparks Lois’s interest. As they leave the packed street, neither of them spots the mysterious watcher who has been following Lois. Jeff and Lois immediately hit it off and spend the next several days going on a series of dates. They are inseparable and love blossoms.

The watcher in the street is not the only one who has been keeping an eye on Lois, however. Felicity Green and her cabal watch Lois through a mystic looking glass. Lois had belonged to Felicity, and Felicity is not just jealous but covetous and vengeful. She wants Lois back bad, and she has an assortment of minions to do her work for her. One of those tools is a big and burly sailor turned thrall.

Jeff wakes up to find Lois gone, a hex splattered across the wall, and a zombie at the door. The zombie, mouth stitched shut and unable to speak, hands Jeff a note. It simply reads “You are in danger!” Jeff gets dressed and follows the zombie to a shop of curios owned by Velvet Green. Velvet is an expert in the tradition of voodoo and has been keeping an eye on Felicity’s cabal long before Jeff got involved. Jeff, naturally, has his doubts about the situation but after Velvet explains Jeff’s very mortal and critical situation, he listens.

Velvet explains that Lois is one of a group of Loup Garou, commonly known as werewolves, but not quite the way folklore tells it. Her group is enthralled by Felicity Green, a voodoo witch, who uses the group as sirens to seduce men and feed off their life essence. In the process, Felicity and her sirens are kept young and the men are reduced to zombies. Velvet reveals she knows all this because she is Felicity’s daughter. As Velvet explains, Jeff is under the effect of the Loup Garou curse and has begun the transformation into a zombie.

It’s not all grim news, however, his professed love for Lois has broken her from Felicity’s enthrallment. Their romance has created an opportunity to strike at Felicity and end the curse. He’ll just need some help. She introduces him to Sheck, the zombie he’d followed and Felicity’s ex-husband, as well as Father Milligan. The good father has taken a post to confront evil in New Orleans should it arise. He is often overlooked by the church but he takes his role seriously. After performing a quick sanctification of Jeff the father says it will be up to Jeff, as his love for Lois will be what strengthens him in his fight with the Loup Garou.

The story continues as Jeff investigates the curse and searches for Lois who has been taken prisoner by Felicity. He’ll find himself going from the dingiest apartments to the swankiest hotels of the French Quarter, and even relic hunting in the bayou. Jeff’s race against time will grow more frantic as he continues to fade from the world of humanity and become more zombie-like with each day. Along the way, he meets and relies on a varied cast of characters. Jeff grows from a man who had nothing outside of his 9-to-5 to a man with love, friends, and a divine calling.

That’s part of what really sets Sirens apart from other adventure-horror stories. The human elements motivate everything in the story. While the events are surely traumatic, Jeff has experienced more positive growth from the connections he made along the way.

The characters he connects differ from the traditional stereotypes that can found in horror. The roles and titles they fill are definitely staples of the genre but they act in ways not typical of titles that share the same shelf-space.

First of all, Jeff Delmer. The well-to-do business guy is certainly a mainstay of horror and is usually a hyped-up playboy who the audience loves to see get killed. Jeff, however, is quite the opposite. Jeff is rather down about his lot in life because he didn’t choose it. Romance was something he didn’t think about until he saw Lois. His change really shows what good purpose and meaningful connection can do for a person.

There is also the case of Velvet Green. Every story having to do with the occult or voodoo has a mystic of sorts. Even better if they are related to the bad guy. Rarely, however, are they as practical as Velvet. Mystic types are often portrayed as aloof, their head wrapped up in ritual and esoteric elements of the problem at hand. Velvet, however, is thinking the next step forward. She is aware of the very real and physical danger the group is in and is thinking of how to combat that with the combined arms of brunt and mysticism. When she comes into play, she very easily takes the role of leader, knowing exactly what needs to be done and how to do it as efficiently as possible.

Father Milligan also lives outside of the norms of how religious authorities are portrayed in the genre. This role is portrayed by some stories as the subject of ridicule for sounding crazy despite being right, or as the powerful and domineering voice of authority. Father Milligan is neither. He is not ridiculed, he is just unimportant and often overlooked. Nor is he domineering, he is thoughtful and patient. This is Jeff’s crusade and Father Milligan knows that and simply offers him help and resources where he can.

One of the most unlikely characters is Sheck, the zombie. Not mindless or a monster. Sheck is Jeff’s stalwart protector and is oddly charismatic. Despite being unable to speak, Sheck’s body language and physical presence in panels provide to be both eerie and endearing. Through acts like watching over Jeff as he sleeps or just the way he holds his face, Jeff and Sheck develop a tight but strange relationship that is reminiscent of the central relationship in a “buddy- cop” story. In the end, the reader finds themselves rooting for the two as friends fighting back to back.

Through smart characters and a new take on Creole mythology Sirens does a lot to set itself apart and is a memorable and engaging read. This is a great comic for fans of action/adventure stories and classic horror.

Sirens was written by Sidney Williams, known to comic fans for writing The Mantus Files, Marauder, and the upcoming Bloodline and Friar Rush. He is best know for his novels such as Gnelfs, and Night Brothers, as well as for many pieces of short fiction.

Art for Sirens was penciled by John Drury, who created Pendulum, and inked by Chuck Bordell, whose credits include Marauder, Switchblade, and several games like the Neverworld RPG.

Sirens 1, 2, and 4 were lettered by Brad Thromte who has worked on such titles as Mouseguard: Tales of the Guard, Pantheon, Switchblade, and Marauder. Issue 3 was lettered by Todd Arnold.

As can be seen in assorted color panels above, Sirens is getting the color treatment from Silverline’s own super-talented Barb Kaalberg, and will be available as a color trade once complete.

05Apr/20

Kayless kickstarter ending

Kayless kickstarter ending

Kayless ends in about 2 days and we still need your help. We’re pushing hard to try to beat the kicstarter for #1, but we’ve got a ways to go. $2000 is the final stretch goal we would really love to achieve. So, share share, and back/support if you can.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/rolandmann/kayless-1-and-2

02Jan/20

Silverline: Looking ahead to year 2(020)

2020 looks to be a busy year for Silverline…and that’s pretty exciting to all of us!

Panels from Friar Rush #1

For non-comics, we’ll be launching a weekly live stream. Current plan is for them to be Wednesday’s at 8pm EST. We’ll have a couple of different segments, including an indy comic review and a segment on the craft of making comics. Stay tuned for the exact launch date for it.

We’re still working on appearances for 2020, we’ve already been invited back to Daytona Beach Comic Con—and have accepted. Just not sure exactly which ones of us will be there. Roland will be at Three Rivers in Pittsburgh, his first show ever in the state of PA! More dates and appearances to come, be we hope to see a bunch of you at a bunch of shows!

We’ve got a big slate of books we’ll be releasing in 2020, so many that we may experiment with some Silverline crowdfund “packages.” Meaning, more than one book per crowdfund. Honestly, it’s exciting to look at this list to see all the content will be delivering to you—we know you’re gonna like them!

Mentioned last week in title only, the projects that are nearly complete and should ready to crowdfund very soon:

*Bloodline, 1 shot: by Sidney Williams (writer), Rob Sachetto (penciller), Terry Pallot (inker), Brian Dale (letterer). This one is finished except for the colors, which is being done by Keith Wood.

*Friar Rush #1, 3 issue mini: by Sidney Williams (writer), Marc Thomas (penciller), John Martin (inker), Rebecca Winslow (colorist), Brian Dale (letterer). The first issue is being both colored and lettered at the same time.

A page from DIVINITY #1

*Divinity #1, 4 issue mini: Created by Barb Kaalberg and co-written by R.A. Jones. It also features Alex Sarabia (penciller), Barb Kaalberg (inker), Steve Mattson (colorist) and Mike Belcher (letterer). It is nearly complete.

*Twilight Grimm #1, 4 issue mini: by R.A. Jones (writer) and Rob Davis (artist), Alex Gallimore (colorist), and Mike Belcher (letterer). The first issue only needs color!

*Kayless #2, 4 issue mini: by Brent Larson (writer), Luis Czerniawski (artist), Leandro Huergo (colorist), Mike Belcher (letterer). This issue needs colors and letters.

A bit later in the year, these should be ready:

A page from WHITE DEVIL #1

*Cat & Mouse #3, 4 issue mini: by Roland Mann (writer), Alex Gallimore (penciller), Barb Kaalberg (inker), Kevin Gallegly (colorist).

*White Devil II, 4 issue mini: by R.A. Jones (writer), Jaxon Renick (penciller), with inks by Mike Keeney and Chuck Bordell. The first issue only needs color!

*Trumps book 1; by Roland Mann (writer), Anthony Pereira and Thomas Hedglen (pencillers), Thomas Florimonte (inker), Sid VinBlu (colorist), Brian Dale (letterers).

13Nov/19

Silverline Creator Spotlight: Chuck Bordell

Each month we’ll be shining the spotlight on a Silverline creator and sharing their secret origin story, learning what makes them tick, and giving you the scoop on how they came up in the comics world.  

Up today is Chuck Bordell, who has inked for such publishers as Malibu Comics, Caliber Comics, Brainstorm Comics, Alpha Productions, and of course, Silverline Comics. Chuck has even produced art for Steve Jackson Games and Dungeon Magazine.

Now, without further ado, we present to you…

12 QUESTIONS WITH… CHUCK BORDELL

So, who are you and where do you hail from?

I’m Chuck Bordell and I grew up in Pennsylvania, but I’ve been living in Montana for the last 30 years. I stayed for the trout fishing and the 8 feet of snow we get every year, Oh yeah I’ve come across several bears as well. You’ve never felt fear until you see a bear in the wild…couple of locals, amongst others.

What would you say it is you do here?

Well, I mainly work as an inker, but I’ve done some pencil jobs as well.  I’ve done a LOT of books for Silverline, including Silverstorm 2, Marauder, Sirens, and Switchblade. Right now I’m inking White Devil.

Where might Silverline readers have seen your work previously?

 I’ve done freelance work for Malibu Comics, Caliber Comics, Alpha Productions, Brainstorm Comics. I’ve also done illustration for TSR, Steve Jackson Games, etc, and two graphic novels, Witness to War and Lunatic Fringe that I wrote and illustrated. I love the fantasy RPGs I’ve worked on because I like drawing monsters!

When you’re not making great Silverline comics, what do you do in your spare time? What are your hobbies?

I collect coins and militaria, enjoy fishing and visiting art galleries.  Studying the Civil War is also a passion.  I’d like to make another trip to Gettysburg in the near future.

Many creators at Silverline have been in the comics industry for years — what’s kept YOU plugging away at comics? What do you enjoy most about the medium, as well as your specific trade?

I just love the art form. It’s totally unique. That combination of images and words is just magic. There have been times when I thought of giving up, but I always come back to comics.

What was the first comic you remember reading that made you think, “Hey, I could do this!”

 Probably a Ross Andru Spiderman from the mid 70s. He’s one of my all-time favorite artists. .I think his run on Spiderman totally defined the character for me. My Mom still has Spiderman comics I made when I was about 10.

What’s on your playlist? Who/what music do you listen to, and do you listen to it while you work?

I mainly listen to Metal, including Metallica, AC/DC, Triumph, Dream Theater, Megadeth, Kiss, etc,  Always good to play while drawing. I need music that can keep my brain cranking while I’m working.  So yeah I’m a metalhead, although I cut off my long hair a couple years ago.

Who were some of your earliest influences on your trade?

 Ditko, Kirby, Miller, Andru, Golden. If I could have Frank Miller’s storytelling with Michael Golden’s art, I’d be a happy dude. But all of them show such creativity that I’m amazed every time I see their work.

What was the first comic you ever worked on professionally? 

 A book called Totem, drawn by Paul Pelletier, published by Alpha Productions. It was an ink job I did completely with Rapidograph pens!  Last time I ever did that. I now have so many inking tools that I need one of those mini-houses to keep everything in!

Can you still read that comic today without wincing?

 Nope. It makes me totally embarrassed even if no one else is looking,  I mean it’s not totally hideous, but my style has change a lot over the years.  Brushes are my friends now, and I use a lot of Micron Pigma pens.

What are some non-Silverline independent comics you would recommend to readers?

Courtney Crumrin, Bone, Pogo (that’s an old one, but it’s brilliant) any of the EC war books. I will pick up books I’ve never heard of before just to give them a chance. It’s only a couple bucks and you never know when you’ll find  treasure.

If you could go back in time and give your younger self one piece of advice that would help them better navigate the comics industry, what would it be?

Write and draw your own work. It’s the best way to learn and it’s the most satisfying. Even if it never gets published, there’s a satisfaction to finishing a book that’s totally your own.  I bet just about all comic artists/writers have unpublished projects in their archives.

After you die, would you rather your memory be memorialized with an overpass or a parking lot? 

 A parking lot. Open space in all directions. Then there could be enough parking for a comic convention. Chuck’s Blacktop Convention sounds good. A combination comic book/flea market/fantasy/coin show.

—–

Chuck is currently busy inking Silverline’s upcoming White Devil written by R.A. Jones with pencils by Jaxon Renick. What, you didn’t know about that yet? No announcements have been made yet—but you heard it here first! Also, Chuck and Roland Mann collaborated on a civil war short that was published in Chuck’s Victor’s Horror Compendium.