01Mar/22

Craft: Roland Mann – Filling Multiple Roles in Comics

Hey there Silverline Family,

We hope you are all safe and well out there. Especially if you’re a reader in Europe, please take care and we hope that you’re safe. If you’re elsewhere around the world remember to take a break from the doomscrolling and take care of your mental health. We hope our comics and content can give you nice reprieve to relax and be entertained. 

This week we have another Craft Interview. This time with the big cheese, Roland Mann. You might know Roland from a lot of things. He’s the EIC and founder here at Silver, he’s written several comics such as Cat & Mouse, and Trumps. Previously, he was an editor at Marvel and Malibu. He’s also an educator who teaches a course about writing comics, so he may have been your instructor at some point. So listen up class!

This week we talk about working in comics are the multiple duties one might have to fulfill at once. When you’re breaking in and especially if you choose a career in the indies, you may find yourself wearing multiple hats. (I’m a writer, editor, and online content guy, and all I got was this dang shirt.) It’s not uncommon for the team you’re working with to ask you to cover multiple roles to make sure the business of comics gets done for your comic. If you’re a purely independent creator, you get the worst end of it. Finance, marketing, partnerships, and creative all get handled by you. Chances are you might also need to freelance on other comics at the same time make ends meet. 

I hope you enjoy this interview where Roland gives us insight into how he creates and how he covers the multiple duties he needs to do. 

 

Craft: Roland Mann – Filling Multiple Roles in Comics

 

TK: It’s my understanding that Trumps has been rattling around in your mindpalace for a while now. How long do you typically let an idea sit before you develop it, or progress to writing. Is it more of waiting for the right moment for the time, or do you fully develop the idea and then store it until you are able to execute it?

RM: Your understanding is correct. The Trumps concept was born in the late 90s. As I’ve said other places, my family plays a lot of cards, and the idea of the four suits as four kingdoms at war struck me during one such evening while playing Pinocle with my parents. I jotted down the idea quickly, then fleshed the idea out during my next writing session. I don’t generally let ideas sit for too long because I feel like I have to go where my brain is taking me right then. If I wait a month, I might forget where I was headed. But the other reason is that I think WITH my writing. I write and rewrite and revise as part of the “thinking” process.

TK: If an idea is coming together, either in development, or once actual writing or illustration has begun and you feel like it’s not doing the story justice, how do you pivot? Do you just truck through and then hit it again in revisions or do you pursue another idea that you feel the team is better suited for? Any examples?

RM: No, I won’t truck through. I have done that before, but that’s the reason I won’t do it now. Revising or fixing something that isn’t working is far easier—in my opinion—to fix before it is finished than to finish and then try to fix. I think if it’s finished, it’s more difficult to get your mind away from THAT idea. If I stop right then and address the problem, then I can play the “what if” game. What if my character does A? What if my character does B? What if my character does C? and so on. I’ll try to figure out the place in the story the problem is, then see what decision the character can make in a different way—and not just ONE way, what are all sorts of possibilities. Now, I will add this, I try VERY hard to do all that BEFORE an artist gets it. In my view, it’s far easier for me to make the changes at a story level, than for the artist to have to make changes in the art, which could potentially mean a lot of different pages requiring changes. That’s not fair to the artist, and it also signals to the artist that you don’t really know what you’re doing as a writer.

The best example from my own writing, I can’t go into a lot of details because it’s from something unpublished. (how’s THAT for a plug?) But I have a novel that’s now complete, but I was stuck for a time (I don’t believe in writer’s block) on a pivotal decision that a character made. I’d moved passed that point, but it just wasn’t working. So I backtracked to the decision, played out several “what if” scenarios, picked one that I thought worked the best…and went from there. And wouldn’t you know it, the remainder of the novel came fairly easily!

TK: In addition to writer, you also serve as an editor, and several other business titles (but that’s getting too deep in the sausage). Many comic creators will probably find themselves wearing multiple hats, especially in the indies. How do you balance working on your own work and working on the other roles you fill. Is there any special considerations when it comes to budgeting time developing your titles versus helping other creators create their titles.

RM: OMG, that’s a tough one. The truth is that I really do love to see new creators enter the team of the published. There’s not a lot of money in comics, but there’s a lot of emotional rewards. For instance, I’m very excited that our next kickstarter includes WOLF HUNTER, written by our own Tim TK (who supplied these questions and I feel like I’m addressing all the answers to him!). And while it won’t be his first publication, it will be his first published comic book. I like that because I know how “I” feel when I see my work in printed form, and it excites me to know that Tim will get that exact feeling when he holds the printed copies of WOLF HUNTER #1 in his hands! As far as how I budget the time…I wish I could tell you that I have a big spreadsheet (like I used to have as editor at Marvel and Malibu) that has the timelines for every project and every title we’re doing…but the truth of the matter is that because we’re so small press, the timelines for every creator on every title is so different. Someone like Aaron Humphres can really produce pages quickly as his “day job” allows him greater flexibility to create more pages. On the other hand, someone like Dean Zachery can’t do that because his day job requires more time from him that keeps him from drawing the thing he wants to draw. ALL of us want to be more like Aaron, of course, but we can only do what we can do. So my personal decisions on helping other creators budget their titles depends greatly on what the team as a whole can do.

Hope that makes sense.

TK: How does also being a writer influence the kind of feedback you, or how does also being an editor influence how you react to feedback? How you do find the path to encourage a creator to really improve their original idea without getting behind the steering wheel too much yourself?

RM: That’s also a tough one. An editor’s job, or even someone just offering feedback is not to make the writer’s story THEIR story. It’s to try to figure out what the writer is trying to tell and help guide them on that path. Now, there are some things, obviously, that the writers don’t necessarily see because they are so close to the story that the editor can see, and that the writer sometimes thinks the editor is butting in.
One example of this I can think of is the upcoming KNIGHT RISE. Mackenzie had sent me a really nice outline of the story she wanted to tell…the problem with the story is that it wasn’t “A” story, but it was two stories. We swapped a few emails and suddenly she was like “Whoa! Cool! Yeah, I see that”—and she went off to the races with it (And I know readers are really going to love it!)

Another example that comes to mind is with WOLF HUNTER. I remember your summary and the initial second issue was very claustrophobic because it was all inside the train AND it was a lot of talking heads. My recollection is that you knew the story front and back, knew what you were trying to accomplish, but didn’t realize the second issue was like that because it was surrounded with action on either side. So you simply (I say “simply” –ha) rearranged some of the stuff, added a bigger action sequence and made stronger use of noir-style narration  to make it work. 
And I think that leads me to the part of the answer that can be tough: An editor has to think about more than the story. Yeah, you want to make sure all the elements of story are there, but you also have to take into consideration the audience. The editor is really the first audience member, but they come at it with a writer’s eye. Not only that, an un-emotionally-invested writer’s eye. An editor can look at a story and say “hey dude, there’s no action here,” or “hey, there’s nothing at stake for your protagonist here,” or “why do we care about this?” because they see that when they read it. They can then offer up suggestions to the writer not in an attempt to write the story for them, but in an attempt to get the writer thinking about the problem and figuring out how to address it. I always try to offer suggestions to writers when I’m editing, and I try to offer up at least two suggestions which take the character or story in completely opposite directions in order to get the writer to look at all the possibilities. Often what happens is they come up with something that isn’t quite as extreme as my suggestions, something in the middle of the two polar opposites I suggest…and it works.

TK: How would you say your workload has shifted compared to when you got into comics. I would assume you have more responsibilities, but technology has also advanced. Do you find that some tasks are generally more efficient, either as a writer or editor, and has that made your creative life easier or harder, or has it simply made room for more work to fill your day?

RM: The big difference is that when I got into comics, that was what I did full time for a little more than a decade. Now, my primary responsibility is as a college professor. Comics are my night gig. I’m very fortunate in that my boss encourages me to stay involved in comics. A near exact quote from her is something to the effect of “I want you to keep doing that because it keeps you relevant.” Which is really funny, but when you think about it, is also very real. The department can continue to say “the guy who teaches comics is also a comic maker today,” instead of “he used to make comics a bunch of years ago.”

But there are indeed a lot of things that are easier today than they were when I got started in the late 80s thanks to technology. Some of the more obvious things might be the ability to instantly receive the art from the artist as soon as they are done. We no longer have to wait on the mail to hopefully deliver the original art in undamaged condition. We can work with folks internationally a whole lot easier for the same reason.

I can also communicate with creators a lot easier than back then when my options were phone (not always convenient), mail (super slow), or fax (whaaaaa?). I can send you an email and you can get me a pretty quick response when you get to it.
But I DO think that technology has caused me to have a serious case of over commitment. When I was employed as an editor full time, I edited an average of about 6-7 titles a month. Silverline is not remotely close to monthly, but we’ve got 22 projects…YES, TWENTY TWO!!!…in various stages of development. While I try to keep up with where they are all, sometimes things fall through the cracks (that’s why I’m getting some help from Dante Barry on that soon!), not because I care more about one over the other, but simply because I’m looking one way and miss the one in the other direction! Lol

22Feb/22

Content Spotlight: The Comics Fu Show – Brad Graeber

Hey Silverline Fam!

I know what you’re thinking. “That’s a lot of content spotlights back-to-back.” You’re right, and to that I say, we got good content dangit! We got lots of dope videos and interviews being live-streamed or uploaded all the time. We’ll be back with another Craft here soon, but this week we uploaded a special video that I want to feature!

That video is another episode of The Comics Fu show. I said it last time, but this is my favorite type of content that we create. This week features a conversation with Brad Graeber, CEO/CCO of Powerhouse Animation (Seis Manos, Masters of the Universe: Revelations, Castlevania, Blood of Zeus). When it comes to guests with clout, this is a contender for the peak. Castlevania is also in my top 5 for favorite modern shows, so Brad if you’re watching, hi.

In this episode, Co-hosts Sifu Kurtis Fujita and Patrick Lugo ask brad about how Kung Fu influences movement, animation, and everyday life.

As a practicing kickboxer, hearing how different martial artists combine their arts (combat and comic) is always fascinating. Taking that conversation and including animation really provides a lot of food for thought. I grew up watching anime and animation and was always fascinated by the visual poetry of a well-choreographed fight. Getting some insight on the creative side of that is really powerful.

I definitely recommend taking some time and checking out this video.

Stay good!

15Feb/22

Content Spotlight: Valentine’s Day Podcasts

Hey there Silverline Fam,

It’s the day after valentines day, and you know what that means? We got content for you to watch! There are rose petals on the floor, sandals on the table, and Phil Collins in the air. Before you get to cleaning that up or shooing Phil away, throw one of these podcasts on your YouTube viewing device and spend the next couple of hours chilling while we talk about romance in comics.

This week we’re featuring both an episode of Wednesday Wham and Silver Sunday. Each crew tackles the subject of romance in comics and provides a unique perspective on it. The lineups for each show also differ from the current roster so you get to see different creators in conversation than on current episodes of each show.

Make sure to check out both of these great shows, as well as this week’s lineup of podcasts starting with A Show on Tuesday tonight at 8 PM PST.

Be good out there, fam!

08Feb/22

Content Spotlight: Silverline’s Getting a Facelift

Hey there Silverline Fam!

It’s a new year, new me kind of vibe over at the Silverline Youtube. We’re breaking up wax, hitting the tanning salon, and getting lean for hot-nerd summer. Well, we may not all be going that extreme. But we are getting a major facelift to our podcast videos.

As you probably know by now, every single Tuesday, Wednesday, and Sunday, we livestream a podcast that gets saved as a VOD on our youtube. That way you can throw us up on your laptop at work, your smart tv after work, or annoy your spouse by watching us on your phone in bed. That last one may get you kicked out to the living room couch.

Under the direction of our CEO, BJ Mann, our videos have a new sense of confidence and a sleek new look for that summer bod. The content of each episode is now spending a bit more time in the training center before coming out and strutting its stuff. So that means each episode will have more hyperfocus, leaving some room for the same old fun asides. But that’ll give the host more time and space to really dig deep into the subject material and deliver to you some true nuggets of wisdom to chew on.

The second part of this facelift is the facelift. Each episode now has a beautiful thumbnail that is sure to appease the almighty algorithm. Or at least, give you the viewer a better idea of what’s going on, as well as build a stronger and more cohesive identity for Silverline. That way if you’re bored and staring at your recommended page, we’ll be easier to identify. Just look for the chiseled chin of Dean.

You can already see it in action!

Check out last week’s and this week’s episodes and get some of that sweet sweet beach-bod VOD taste for yourself.

01Feb/22

Craft : Jose Fuentes

Hey Silverline Fam,

Every Week I have the pleasure to hang out with Jose Fuentes on A Silverline Show on Tuesday. I figured it was about time I got down in the dirt with him and asked him about his craft as an inker. Jose is an all-around talented artist and comics professional, but he takes pride in his inks and has some of the best grit I’ve seen in a person. In this week’s issue of craft, we talk about his use of alternate inking techniques and the work ethic he brings to the page. I hope you all can find some bits of inspiration from the answers Jose gave. I certainly did!

TK: In some of our previous conversations you had talked about applying ink in not just traditional drawn lines, but by flicking or smearing some of the ink. Getting a sort of special effect on the panel. How often do you attempt to do that sort of application or do you have to balance more towards digital inking now?

JF: There are several techniques you can use to give the impression of texture in a flat/2d drawing. Smearing and flicking are just a couple options. I try to use different inking techniques to give that effect on every piece or page if it calls for it. You don’t want to “overwork” a page. You have to be mindful to not overwork the penciler’s work with ink. There is definitely a balance that you have to keep in mind. I try and do the same with any digital inks that I am working on. There are a lot of different digital brushes you can buy/download to help give you the same effects that I try and use traditionally

TK: As a follow-up, how much do you prefer working physically or digitally? What are some of the pros and cons of either?

JF: I prefer to ink traditionally. I like the feel of the crow quill on the paper and trying new techniques. I didn’t use to. I hated to have ink or pencil graphite on my hands, but I have learned to appreciate the process. I don’t get the same feeling from digital, but I have embraced the challenge of trying to achieve the same techniques digitally.

TK: You have also said that you haven’t worked that day if your hands don’t have ink on them. Obviously, that may not be the case if you’re working digitally that day, but do you think that same work ethic, that sense of “really getting into your work” applies?

JF: So the phrase was said to me by Jan Duursema. Then she taught us to [use] various techniques that I still used today. I took everything she taught me to heart and adapted the phrase as more of a motto for my life. Taking this motto into my digital work gives it a bit of a twist. No, I’m not physically getting dirty, but I used it to motivate me to try my best [and use] many digital tricks to make my digital inks look like physical inks

TK: Would you think that mindset is ingrained in you and you apply that to your craft or is that something that came out of specifically your comic craft?

JF: I feel that this developed through the course of my education. I was more laid back in my own personal training, mostly because I was working to take care of my family so I put my art on the warmer. Schooling was a huge eye-opener for me. I learned that I can actually work in comics. I knew I could draw but I never really had much confidence in my career as an artist. My wife is super supportive and has pushed me to reach for my dream job. And now I work on comics full time!

TK: One last thing, what are you currently working on and where can people follow you or see some of your work?

JF: I am currently working on digital inks for Silverline Comics Obsoletes book. Digital colors for a six-page story for Peter Clinton that will be in the Voyage: Melting Pot, and I have a digital coloring job for a book that has been put on the backburner. I’m also lined up to do traditional inks on a book for Jay Cornwell, a local artist in my area.

25Jan/22

New Silverline Book & The Blog Strikes Back

Hey there Silverline Fam!

I hope you all had a dope holidays and that the start of your 2022 has been good. I had to take a break from the blog to deal with a bit of a family thing and then I got destroyed by a respiratory infection (not Covid). I didn’t forget about you all though.

There’ll be a full-length post next week when I’m back to 100%.

In the meantime, you ALL need to swing on over to our Kickstarter and make sure you have preordered your copies of Rejects and Sniper & Rook. This campaign will run until 01/30/2022. So get in NOW.

Be good all, and see you next week!
05Jan/22

A Look Into 2022

What’s in store for Silverline for 2022?

The best laid plans of mice and men, right? While we’re going to go through with this post, it’s offered with the full knowledge that this may change as the year progresses. Heck, it may even change by next week. Still, hopefully this will give you a general idea of where we’re headed and what’s up for this new year.

What Silverline books should we see KS in 2022?

If you’re making plans for your comic reading in 2022, we’d be honored if you include Silverline in your plans; we’re planning to KS every other month. So, Jan, Mar, May, July, Sep, and Nov. There will be no three months in a row this year as that just about killed us—well, at least Roland! OUCH. So, those of you who work with some pretty strict budgets, make note of those months on your calendar!

Which books, you ask? Well, as you know, we don’t kickstart them until we’re done, but based on production status as of this post, here’s a list of the 12 comics we expect we’ll crowdfund this year (in no certain order):

  • Rejects #1
  • Sniper & Rook #1
  • Cat & Mouse #4
  • Wolf Hunter #1
  • Divinity #3
  • Obsoletes #1
  • Beah #2
  • Silverline Team-Up #2
  • Trumps #3 and #4
  • Teen Beetle #2
  • White Devil #2
  • Twilight Grimm #4
  • Knight Rise #1
  • Shadow Ghost #1
  • Satin’s Ways #1
  • Kayless (V2) #1
  • Capetown #1
  • Demon’s Tails #1 ReMix
  • Switchblade #2 ReMix
  • Pendulum #1 ReMix
  • Sirens #1 Remix

So…yeah, as you can see, that’s more than 12 comics. So, it really just depends on which ones get finished first. We DO know which one will launch next week: Rejects #1 and Sniper & Rook #1 (vol2, the introduction of SNR into the Silverline world). In fact, you can SIGN UP TO BE NOTIFIED ON LAUNCH by going to this link (please do this if you will): https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/silverlinecomics/sr1r1

The Rejects

Rejects is one of those projects that has been on the stove for some time in one form or another, but it really came to life when C. Michael Lanning signed his name on the dotted line in 2020 (yes, it has taken THAT long to make it happen!). C. was coming off another project that ended up going nowhere, and while his pencil work there was good, the work he did on Rejects seemed truly inspired. We think you’re going to be truly amazed at it!
Rejects is a story about a team of Rejected superheroes who want to earn recognition. Roland Mann is writing, Thomas Florimonte is inking, and Haley Martin is coloring.

Cover pencil art by C.Michael Lanning

Sniper & Rook

Yes, THAT Sniper & Rook! Long time fans of S&R will be happy to hear of their return.

Jack Barton (Sniper) and Rebecca Paige (Rook) blast back into comics in their roles as undercover, covert military operatives serving the United States of America directly under the command of decorated General Davis Jefferson. From the United States to the Soviet Union to Japan, and from political theater to mythical creatures to historical coverups, their previous missions have not only spanned the globe, but have also traversed genres. Their newest mission may very well take them further than ever before in both regards .

“Sniper & Rook: Area 50-wha??” chronicles the tale of their mission to the most well known top secret location ever – Area 51 – and launches our duo full-force into a confrontation that’s been over 75 years in the making, ever since the “weather balloon” crashed in Roswell, New Mexico .

Sniper & Rook: Area 50-wha?? #1 is science fiction/superhero, full color 24 pages, is the first of a three issue mini-series. Silverline is proud to be the publisher that ushers in their return and introduce them to a whole new set of readers. This issue is just the first of many, and we can’t wait for you to see what the future holds for them.

Cover to upcoming Sniper & Rook

Streams

In the works are two new streams that we hope to be presenting in the coming weeks. One will be limited in the number of weeks and will be more educational (making comics!), the other will be more fun, but a little different. More on that as we can tell you more, but we’re always trying to create more content for you!

New Projects

If you are a regular watcher of our streams, you’ve likely gotten sneak peaks as some of the upcoming material and/or have heard us talk about them. Since this time last year, we’ve added these titles to our ever-growing line-up:

  • Knight Rise
  • Shadow Ghost
  • Obsoletes
  • Silver Blade
  • Sol Ascendant
  • Rochelle, the Teen Cockroach (v3)
  • Kayless (v2)
  • Beyond the Stars

Special Items for 22

We produced a Signature Book that debuted at Christmas of ’20, and had it with us the entire year. In ’22, that book will be a little different as some faces will rotate off and new faces will rotate in, but the concept will be the same. We’ll have a different colored cover to help you know the difference (and us, too).

Whew…that’s it for now. Hopefully you’ll tune in as you can to the streams to watch as these projects take shape.

Thank you all for the wonderful support you continue to give. And remember to

#makeminesilverline

28Dec/21

A Review of 2021 (Year 3 of Silverline 3.0)

Crowdfunding

Despite the fact that 2021 was still a Covid-year for many, it was a good year for Silverline Comics. We crowdfunded and shipped (on time!) 12 comics! Twilight Grimm #3 and White Devil #1 will ship in early January but funded in December…so I’m not sure which year to put them in.

The complete list is:

Teen Beetle #1 and Switchblade #1 ReMix, funded in January and shipped in March. Twilight Grimm #2 and Friar Rush #2, funded in March and shipped in May. Divinity #2 and Steam Patriots #1, funded in May and shipped in July, our biggest to date. Beah #1 and Silverline Team-Up #1, funded in July and shipped in September. Kayless #3 #4 and TPB, funded in September and shipped in November. Silverline Christmas Special, funded in October and shipped in December.

Twilight Grimm #3 and White Devil #1 (in Nov/Dec—will be shipping in a few weeks)

That is 13 total comics.

THIRTEEN TOTAL COMICS.

Whew!

Yeah, yeah, I get we could point to a lot of indy comic makers who do more than that, but considering we did seven in 2020 and two in 2019…well, color US impressed! I don’t expect us to do considerably more than that next year—but that’s for next week to talk about.

Streams grow to three weekly!

We started streaming in March of last year (2020) with the one stream. In a matter of months, we grew to two streams weekly, adding Sunday. Well, in 2021, we added a third weekly stream geared more for a west cost audience as it runs 8-10pm PST. THAT SILVERLINE SHOW ON TUESDAY is hosted by Tim TK (who does most of these weekly blog posts!). Tim is generally joined by Quinton Bedwell, Jose Fuentes, and Aaron Humphres (every other week).

Here are the links for you:
Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/SilverlineComics),
Youtube (https://www.youtube.com/silverlinecomics)
Twitch (https://www.twitch.tv/silverlinecomics).

You can find us Sundays 8-10p EST, Tuesdays 8-10p PST, and Wednesdays 8-10pm EST. It’s free to watch!

Discord

We’re still trying to push more social media content over to Discord…but haven’t had a lot of luck with that. If you’re already on Discord, here’s an invite link for you…come help us populate it!

https://discord.gg/EvnuRVE2Yd

Podcast

For those of you who prefer just audio, we posted audio versions of our streams…a bit behind in schedule, but still you can get the content. You can find those on our website on Apple iTunes, Spotify, etc.

New Projects

We are absolutely not actively looking to grow the line…but sometimes, things just happen. We mentioned last year a project by scribe Ron Fortier. Well, it’s too early to talk about yet, but we’ve got a handshake for another one! But also, SIX OTHER mini-series! What are they?

Obsoletes, written by Wes Locher with pencils by Aaron Humphres (Friar Rush) and inks by newcomer to Silverline Jose Fuentes. The first issue is written and pencilled. Jose is busy inking! Haley Martin (Beah) is lined up to color it.Backers of the Silverline Christmas Special got a sneak peek at this one.

Knight Rise, written by Mackenzie Wertman, with art by Quinton Bedwell. Backers of the Silverline Christmas Special got a sneak peek at this one, too.

Shadow Ghost, is the brainchild of Silverline Creative Director Kurtis Fujita. Kurtis is writing, pencilling, inking–he’s doing it all. It’s a kung-fu comic by a kung-fu master!

Rochelle. Silverline has agreed to publish the 3rd volume of the tale about the teenage cockroach by creator John Crowther (Teen Beetle). Art will be by Teen Beetle artist Dell Barras!

Silver Blade, will be written and pencilled by Dean Zachary. Backers of the Silverline Christmas Special got a sneak peek at this one, too.

Sol Ascendant, will be written by Silverline Associate Editor Tim Tk. Art will be by Cem Dayioglu.

Project status

This is gonna be a long list. Basically, what we’ll do here is try to give you a status update of where the titles we’ve crowdfunded are production wise. Everything is current as of the writing of this blog (initially, mid December). (in alphabetical order)

Beah

Roland is putting the finishing touches on the script for #2. Feel free to chastise him for not having it ready!

Page from Cat & Mouse #4 pencilled by Wubba Fett

Cat & Mouse

Wubba has pencilled 9 pages for Cat & Mouse #4…we’re waiting on more pages from him as he completes a household move! The next issue (#1 of volume 3) is already pencilled!

Divinity

There are six pages of #3 complete. Alex is working on the pencils. #4 has been scripted and is ready!

A page from Divinity #3, pencils by Alex Sarabia with inks and colors by creator Barb Kaalberg.

Friar Rush

#3 is the final issue of the mini-series. It is completely pencilled and lettered and we’re waiting on the inks from John Martin.

Kayless

As all four issues of Vol 1 are now complete and in your hands, #1 for volume 2 is already in the works! The script is done and Luis has pencilled/inked about 6 pages!

Silverline Team-Up

Pete has pencilled about 10 pages of #2.

Steam Patriots

#2 script is still being written.

Teen Beetle

Script for #2 has just been delivered to Dell Barras.

Trumps

Both #3 and #4 are well into production. 16 pages of #3 are pencilled and inked by Quinton Bedwell. Peter Clinton has pencilled about 10 pages of #4.

Twilight Grimm

Issue #4, the final issue of the mini-series, has been pencilled and inked by Rob Davis and is off to Mickey Clausen for colors and Mike W. Belcher for letters!

White Devil

Issue #2 is in the hands of Phil Leon for color! #3 & #4 are also ready for color! #4 needs letters.

ReMix

Switchblade

Switchblade #2 and #3 are complete and ready for crowdfunding/printing.

Sirens

Some of you remember Sirens from the early 90s. Issue #1 and #2 are colored and ready for crowdfunding! Divinity creator Barb Kaalberg is busy coloring issue #3! Here’s a sneak peek at her color work on it!

Pendulum

We know you remember the classic series published by Malibu in the early 90s. Roberta Conroy is working magic on the pages pencilled by John Drury and inked by Ted Slampyak. Don’t believe us–take a peek below. Issues #1 and #2 are done and ready for crowdfunding!

Demon’s Tails

Three issues are colored and ready for crowdfunding! Dave Rios is working on issue #4!

SilverStorm

One issue is ready for crowdfunding! Scott Gordon is working on issue #2!

Whew! So see…2021 was a decent year for Silverline!

Next week we’ll talk about about 2022 has in store for Silverline.

#makeminesilverline

 

14Dec/21

Content Spotlight: Favorite Holidays

Hey there Silverline Fam! We got some festive content to share with you! This week’s feature is an episode of Silver Sunday where the crew talks about their favorite holidays. We really tried to cover all our bases with that smorgasbord style content.

This one is from October but still applies now in December. We do also feature an appearance from Resident Brit, Peter Clinton for the international opinion.

We’ll have some more appropriately festive content in the coming weeks, so be sure to check out those posts.

Also be sure to check out our live stream on Wednesday, December 22 for the Silverline Christmas party! It’s going to feature a whole bunch of different Silverline creators and will be a wild ride!

We hope to see you then, until that time, make mine Silverline!

07Dec/21

We Have Cool (Deadly) Friends!

Hi there Silverline family!

Today we’re featuring something you probably did not see coming. A Kung Fu influenced instrumental-hip-hop music video! If that caught you off guard, I don’t blame you.

Long-time fans of Silverline may have seen some hints. Several members of our crew are practitioners of martial arts or combat sports (kickboxer here). Previously on an episode of the comics-fu show, Kurtis had already talked about the intersection of comics, martial arts, and hip-hop.

And it’s happening AGAIN!

Captain Walas released a single this year titled Drunken Tiger featuring Alan Yip. The inspiration for this single and music video comes from our very own Kurtis Fujita! Kurtis is both a dope comic creator and a sifu (a master and instructor of kung fu). His most recent project Shadow Ghost is a combination of both passions. This title is something you should absolutely be on the lookout for if you enjoy martial arts, comic books, or a good time.

Please check out the music video and give Captain Walas all the love! Be on the lookout for Shadow Ghost in the future. And remember to “make mine Silverline!”